Toronto City Opera

2018-19 Season

Figaro & Traviata PosterLE NOZZE DI FIGARO
by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

DECEMBER 6, 2018 @ 7:30pm

DECEMBER 7, 2018 @ 7:30pm

DECEMBER 9, 2018 @ 2:00pm

(Sung in Italian, with English surtitles)

 

Mozart's commedia per musica about the tyranny of social inequality.  Opera that transcends the lighthearted innocence of opera buffa.  Ageless themes of vengeance and forgiveness, freedom and wisdom, and love conquering lust.

Cast

Figaro – Dylan Wright

Susanna – Brittany Rae

Count Almaviva – Peter Bass

Countess Almaviva – Jonelle Sills

Cherubino – Lillian Brooks

Basilio/Don Curzio – Jeffrey Smith

Marcellina – Daniella Theresia

Bartolo – Gabriel Sanchez-Ortega

Barbarina – Janelle Lapalme

Antonio – Austin Larusson

 

BOX OFFICE
1-800-838-3006

 

ORDER TICKETS ONLINE

 

 

Figaro & Traviata PosterLA TRAVIATA
by Giuseppe Verdi

MARCH 28, 2019 @ 7:30pm

MARCH 29, 2019 @ 7:30pm

MARCH 31, 2019 @ 2:00pm

(Sung in Italian, with English surtitles)

 

La Traviata tells the story of the tragic love between the courtesan Violetta and the young aristocrat Alfredo. The story also depicts the hypocrisy of upper-class society which plunges the two lovers to a sad ending.

Cast

Alfredo Germont – Kijong Wi

Violetta Valéry – Beth Hagerman

Gastone de Letorières – Jeffrey Smith

Flora Bervoix – Veronika Anissimova

Barone Douphol – Anthony Rodrigues

Annina – Dallas Chorley

Giorgio Germont – Handaya Rusli

Dottore Grenvil – TBA

 

 

BOX OFFICE
1-800-838-3006

 

ORDER TICKETS ONLINE

 

LE NOZZE DI FIGARO

Synopsis

 

Figaro & Traviata Poster“The one where the Count and the page hide behind the same chair, where the Countess’s maid makes a surprise exit from a closet and where Figaro discovers the woman who wants to marry him is his mother.” – Sir Dennis Forman

 

If you’re down with that, you can wrap your head around the rest of the plot easy-peesy. The key to this roller coaster plot is it’s all about couples, despite the hanky-panky. Figaro and Susanna are servants and lovers; Marcellina loves Figaro; the Count and Countess are on the outs; and Cherubino is a teenager newly introduced to the joy of hormones, and gaga over every woman he sees.

 

ACT I

Figaro and Susanna, two servants of the Count, are to be married. Figaro is unhappy that their new room is so close to the amorous Count’s. If the Count has designs on Susanna, Figaro promises he will fix his feet. Bartolo and Marcellina enter. Bartolo wants revenge against Figaro for a past misdeed. Marcellina, an older woman, wants to marry him despite his youth. The rivals for Figaro meet and sing a catty duet.

 

Cherubino, the amorous houseboy, visits Susanna. When the Count approaches, Cherubino hides behind a chair. When the Count attempts to put a move on Susanna, Basilio, the music master, enters. The Count hides behind the same chair. This is a big chair, but not that big. Basilio gossips that Cherubino has had amorous interest in Barbarina (the gardener’s daughter), the Countess, and Susanna herself. The Count can’t stand to hear this, blows his cover, and sings the operatic equivalent of “I’ll wring the little bastard’s neck!” Susanna faints. Susanna recovers. Basilio lifts up a tablecloth to blow Cherubino’s cover. A great deal of Italian passion follows, but Figaro enters with the CHORUS and a bridal veil for Susanna. The CHORUS sings Mozart’s version of “For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow” to the Count. But the Count is not feeling so jolly, and plans to get rid of Cherubino by sending him to fight in the army. Figaro sings a mocking aria about cannons, sabers, blood and death. Have a nice day, Cherubino!

 

ACT II

In her bedroom the Countess is depressed over her wandering Count. Susanna, his target, commiserates. The two women and Figaro plot to invite the Count to a tryst with “Susanna” who will really be Cherubino dressed in drag, and then surprise him in flagrante delicto. Cherubino enters. The women undress and dress him. Cherubino enjoys this. Susanna exits. He attempts to make love to the Countess, but the Count announces his arrival, and Cherubino hides in the closet. The Count is nobody’s fool. “Who is in the closet!” he demands, but its door is locked. Susanna slips back in, unseen by the miracle of operatic logic. The Countess suggests that they get a crowbar. The Count locks the bedroom door from the outside. Susanna takes Cherubino’s place in the closet. As the Count and Countess return with the crowbar, Cherubino jumps out the window and into the garden. The Count opens the closet and voila, Susanna! Figaro enters, and providing cover for Cherubino, claims it was he who jumped from the window. “Look, I sprained my ankle!” he says limping about. But sprained ankle or not, Marcellina enters and claims that Figaro must marry her to settle a debt. The act closes with each character singing his or her own tune in a rising musical climax.

 

ACT III

The scene begins with the gruff old Count singing in a minor key, which Susanna shifts into a major key to end the scene in a harmonious duet as she falsely promises to make his dreams come true. The lawyer Don Curzio and Figaro enter. The lawyer demands that Figaro marry Marcellina. Figaro counters that he needs his parents’ permission, and doesn’t know who they are. But his birthmark reveals that his parents are, in fact, Marcellina and Bartolo. The family rejoices, mother embraces son, and in walks Susanna. This does not look good, but after ironing out the family wrinkles, the foursome plans a double wedding. (Things move fast in Opera-land.) A sextet follows with Don Curzio and the Count, but the last two are not happy singers.

 

The mood shifts as the Countess sings about lost love. Susanna enters, and cheers her up with a new twist in the plot to embarrass the Count. The women write a letter confirming that “Susanna” (Cherubino in drag) will meet the Count in the garden at night.

 

A big moment for the CHORUS comes as the town prepares for the weddings. There are complications. The gardener pulls off Cherubino’s wig, the Count gets mad, the gardener’s daughter pleads to marry Cherubino, the Count reads Susanna’s letter of enticement, and Figaro, unaware that the letter’s a trick, darkens with suspicion about Susanna.

 

ACT IV

At night, in the Count’s garden, fireworks are planned - mostly of the sexual kind. And so begins the finale, a sort of zany mix of Mozart and Marx Brothers: Susanna sings of love; Figaro thinks it’s for the Count; Susanna and the Countess dress as one another; Cherubino attempts to make love to the Countess, thinking she’s Susanna; the Count arrives for the tryst and tries to make it with the Countess, thinking, too, that she’s Susanna; Figaro arrives and attempts to make it with Susanna, thinking she’s the Countess. This is looking to be a busy night for Susanna, and she is not happy about Figaro thinking she is the Countess. But true love wins out, and the two make up in a beautiful duet. The Count, always the last to know, is enraged about the “Countess” making love with Figaro until he realizes the “Countess” is really Susanna, Figaro’s intended. The Count refuses to pardon the pranksters, until “Susanna” reveals herself as the Countess. The Count looks like a jerk, and begs her to pardon him. Graciously she does. Everyone rejoices, and fireworks follow.

 

Excerpts

2017-18 SEASON HIGHLIGHTS

 

"O Gott! O Welch ein Augenblick!" from Fidelio

 

Act 1: Quartet from Fidelio

 

Act 2:  Finale from Magic Flute

 

Act 1: Papageno, Pamina, Monastatos and Chorus from Magic Flute

 

Act 1:  Tamino, Papageno and the Three Ladies from Magic Flute

 

 

2016-17 SEASON HIGHLIGHTS

 

 

 

2015-16 SEASON HIGHLIGHTS

 

 

 

Reviews

"The singing was as good – if not better – than what you’d expect to hear at the average Canadian Opera Company performance."

 

"Jay Lambie’s performance reminded of a younger version of the great Luciano Pavarotti...The musical performances will blow you away while the comedic interludes will leave you laughing and smiling throughout the show."

 

"Highlights of the TOR production include the gorgeous, smouldering sounds of Pablo Benitez Astudillo’s Camille de Rosillon...Caroline Colantonio’s Valencienne is a beautifully rendered and subtly demure counterpart"

 

"loved the production and couldn’t believe two and half hours had gone by so quickly"

 

"Community opera at its best"

 

"I have one word - WOW"

Tickets

BOX OFFICE

1-800-838-3006

 

ORDER TICKETS ONLINE

 

 

Recent Seasons

2017-18

FIDELIO | Beethoven

THE MAGIC FLUTE | Mozart

STAGING DIRECTOR
Erik Thor

MUSIC DIRECTOR
Ivan Jovanovic

CO-MUSIC DIRECTOR
Jennifer Tung

 

2016-17

CARMEN | Bizet

MERRY WIDOW | Lehár

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
Beatrice Carpino

MUSIC DIRECTOR
Adolfo De Santis

COLLABORATIVE PIANIST
Ivan Jovanovic

 

2015-16

L'ELISIR D'AMORE | Donizetti

DIE FLEDERMAUS | Strauss

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
Beatrice Carpino

MUSIC DIRECTOR
Adolfo De Santis

COLLABORATIVE PIANIST
Ivan Jovanovic

 

2014-15

DON GIOVANNI | Mozart

UN BALLO IN MASCHERA | Verdi

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
Beatrice Carpino

MUSIC DIRECTOR
Adolfo De Santis

COLLABORATIVE PIANIST
Ivan Jovanovic

 

2013-14

CARMEN | Bizet

COSÌ FAN TUTTE | Mozart

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
Beatrice Carpino

MUSIC DIRECTOR
Adolfo De Santis

COLLABORATIVE PIANIST
Ivan Jovanovic

 

2012-13

BARBER OF SEVILLE | Rossini

TALES OF HOFFMANN | Offenbach

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
Beatrice Carpino

MUSIC DIRECTOR
Giuseppe Macina

COLLABORATIVE PIANIST
Blair Salter

©2017-18 Toronto City Opera